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There is an Apulia you don't know, made up of history, culture and flavors that arouse unique emotions: from Easter events to patronal festivals, from the paths of the soul to the flavors and aromas of gastronomy and wine excellence.

 

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Municipalities of the month

30 April 2021

GALLIPOLI

Kale Polis, the City Beautiful

Kale Polis, the City Beautiful     GALLIPOLI (le) is the beautiful city by exception. Its historic centre is an island linked to the mainland by a stone bridge built in the early 17th century.   Fascinating par excellence, ruled by numerous dominations throughout its centuries-long history, Gallipoli traces its origins to the Messapian civilisation, which identified it with the ancient name of Anxa. The military nature of the city is clear in the civic coat of arms, which depicts a rooster, symbol of vigilance, with a scroll bearing the Latin inscription 'Fedelmente vigila' (Faithfully watchful).   Gallipoli's history is narrated by its places of art and culture. Just outside its ancient city walls is the Fontana antica, an artistic monumental fountain carved out of carparo, depicting the stories of Dirce, Salmace and Biblis, who were turned into fountains of water for their impure loves.   On the same square are the ancient chapel dedicated to Santa Cristina and the Sanctuary of the Madonna del Canneto, called the 'castellana' of Gallipoli.    Among the alleys, courtyard houses and noble palaces, the Cathedral of Sant'Agata, a marvellous example of Baroque art, and the confraternal oratories, among which the famous Church of Santa Maria della Purità stands out. Called 'the Sistine Chapel of Salento', it is the seat of the social category of the 'vastavi', the workers dedicated to porterage operations in the city's ancient merchant port.   From this important mooring point, oil produced in the underground oil mills dotted around the ancient island was shipped. Today, some of these oil mills have been recovered and are places of memory that should absolutely be visited to learn about the history of the production of 'liquid gold'. {IMAGE_2}{IMAGE_4}
  Behind the so-called 'Porta Terra', the Castle towers majestically with its towers, among which the Ennagonal-shaped one stands out, and the Rivellino, an outpost built as further protection for the castle and the town itself.    In the old town centre, amidst numerous shops and boutiques, there are also some of Gallipoli's cultural venues such as the Diocesan Museum, the Frantoio ipogeo (underground oil mill) of Palazzo Granafei, the Civic Museum and the old pharmacy 'Provenzano'.   Behind one of the large towers dotting the walls, one can admire the Church of San Francesco d'Assisi with its famous Malladrone, a statue depicting the thief crucified with Jesus that D'Annunzio described as 'the horrid beauty'.   Near the beach of La Purità, with the perspective of the Island of Sant'Andrea, the sunset is a spectacle that leaves those who witness it breathless. An extraordinary mixture of colours that nature seems to dip into a large fairy palette with the blue of the sky and the sea, and the bright red of the sun dipping into the waters.   Gallipoli, a city to live in and to visit at all times of the year. Christmas with its dirges and sweets, Carnival with its exhilarating and colourful parades, Easter with its ancient rituals, and the suggestive sea festival of the patron saint Santa Cristina, for a travel experience not to be forgotten.   Places to visit: Castle and the Rivellino, Church of Santa Cristina, Sanctuary of the Madonna del Canneto, ANTICA Fountain (16th century), Cathedral of S. Agata, Church and Confraternity of Santa Maria della Purità, Church of S. Francesco d'Assisi.   Photos by: Michele Esposito Text by: Eugenio Chetta, Francesca Fontò

cities

30 April 2021

MONTE SANT'ANGELO

Place oh worship and Unesco sites

Place oh worship and Unesco sites   Located in the heart of the Gargano National Park - Monte Sant'Angelo is home to two UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation) World Heritage Sites: the Lombard traces in the Sanctuary of St. Michael Archangel (2011, as part of the serial site "The Lombards in Italy. The places of power (568-774 A.D.)') and the ancient beech forests of the Umbra Forest (2017, as part of the transnational asset 'Ancient primeval beech forests of the Carpathians and other regions of Europe').   In addition, other important recognitions have arrived in recent years: from National Geographic, which included the Sacred Cave of the Archangel Michael among the 10 most beautiful sacred caves in the world, to Skyscanner, which included Monte Sant'Angelo among the 20 most beautiful cities in Italy; from the Apulia Region, which included the municipality in the regional list of 'municipalities with a predominantly tourist economy and cities of art'; to the Michelin Green Guide, which awarded the historic centre the highest recognition with three stars and included it among the most beautiful villages in Italy.   Beauty travels along the white streets of the old town centre, stands the test of time in front of the majestic Norman-Swabian-Aragonese Castle, remains in your heart in the presence of the monumental façade and the Grotto of the most important sanctuary in the West dedicated to the Archangel Michael, an uninterrupted destination of pilgrimages for 1500 years. {IMAGE_0}{IMAGE_1} Beauty accompanies you to the mysterious Baptistery of San Giovanni in Tumba (known as the 'Tomb of Rotari') and to the marvel of the Church of Santa Maria Maggiore and its frescoes, to listening to the silence at the Abbey of Santa Maria di Pulsano and its Hermitages, to the magical Umbra Forest or along the coast of the marina.   There are numerous traditional, emotional and promotional events: from 8 May with the Michael Festival celebrating the Archangel around the world, through Holy Week - with its evocative and emotional 'miserere and earthquake' rites and the poignant Good Friday Procession.   From 25 June to 7 July, the two UNESCO recognitions are celebrated, passing through the major summer events until September with the Historical Procession of the Apparitions of the Archangel, the patronal feast on 29 September and the Procession of the Holy Sword, the film festival dedicated to the Francigena and Micaelica routes, Mònde.   As numerous are the typical products of gastronomic excellence and local dishes: from the crunchy and famous bread to the sweet full wafers, from the oil of the Macchia plain - where olive trees and the sea meet - to the tasty caciocavallo cheese.   Places to visit: Sanctuary and Grotto of San Michele Arcangelo, Abbey and Hermitage of Santa Maria di Pulsano, Baptistery of San Giovanni in Tumba (known as 'Rotari's Tomb'), frescoes in the Church of Santa Maria Maggiore, Norman-Swabian-Aragonese Castle, TECUM Museums of the Sanctuary (Devotional, Lapidary and Longobard Crypts), MeTA - Museum of Popular Arts and Traditions of the Gargano, the Umbra Forest.   Photos by: Mario Brambilla, Monica Giardina, Leonardo Giordano, Matteo Nuzziello Text by: Pasquale Gatta    

cities

30 April 2021

VICO DEL GARGANO

The Village of Lovers

The Lovers' Village   A village with an ancient heart, VICO DEL GARGANO (Fg) stands in a privileged position in the Sun Mountain (ancient name for the Gargano), on a rocky promontory between the sea, with San Menaio and Calenella, and the Umbra Forest.   It is one of the nine Apulian municipalities that bear the mark 'The most beautiful villages in italy'. Its fine hilly air tempers the summer heat and softens the winter cold. It is an ancient town built on prehistoric settlements, in fact it owes its name to the Schiavoni called by Otto I around 900 AD.   Vico del Gargano enchants visitors with its historic centre, built on the three main nuclei of Civita, Terra and Casale. Its past is dense with prehistoric evidence (the necropolises of Monte Tabor and Monte Pucci are of considerable interest).   The Norman-Swabian period marked the development of Vico del Gargano. Evidence of that era is the Castle, probably built by Frederick II of Swabia's men around 1240, and the town walls that also include watchtowers and several small churches. The old town centre consists of narrow streets, old 'a pujedd' houses (terraced houses with an external staircase, with living quarters on the upper floor and a space underneath used as a stable or store), the remains of walls and towers.    The 'Trappeto Maratea', an old mill for pressing olives that preserves a wooden press dating back to 1317, is worth a special visit. Palazzo Della Bella, a curious early 20th-century building inspired by the 14th-century model of the Florentine Palazzo Vecchio, completes the walk through Vico's historic centre. {IMAGE_6}{IMAGE_2} Just outside the town is the suggestive Convent of the Capuchins with a centuries-old holm oak (17 metres high by 5 metres in diameter) and, inside, a miraculous Crucifix as well as paintings by Vaccaro and Borghese. The Convent of Santa Maria Pura, also outside the town, is a monumental complex of great value that is believed to rest on much older structures, perhaps the Temple of Chalcis.   During the Easter period, the processional events of Vichese Holy Week are one of the most eagerly awaited moments in Vico del Gargano, where five ancient Confraternities have been guarding a heritage of rites, chants and traditions since time immemorial, which finds its most authentic manifestation in those days.   On 14 February, Lovers' Day, Saint Valentine has been celebrated since 1618, acclaimed Patron Saint of the town and its orange groves (Igp). The Saint's relics are kept in the Collegiate Church of the Assumption and are carried in procession through the streets of the town.   On that day, lovers from the surrounding area taste the juice from the blessed oranges as a propitious love potion and exchange sweet effusions in the Kissing Alley, a narrow street in the old town only 50 centimetres wide.   A few kilometres from Vico del Gargano, one descends to the splendid seascape of San Menaio, a small fishing village, which with its vegetation rich in pine and orange groves and its well-equipped beaches is a destination for summer holidaymakers.   Places to visit: Old Town, Castle, Church Matrice, Church of the Misericordia, Church of Santa Maria degli Angeli and the Church of San Pietro, the Umbrian Forest, San Menaio.       Photos by: Pasquale D'Apolito / Gaetano Armenio / Text by: Francesco Paolo Saggese    

cities

30 January 2023

TERLIZZI

The city of flowers and ceramics

The city of flowers and ceramics     The recent recognition of Terlizzi as the city of ceramics exalts the centuries-old tradition of working with clay, which in these districts, in the heart of Apulia, has been able to achieve art forms of unusual beauty. Terlizzi is also the city of extra virgin olive oil and other agri-food delicacies, including the 'Mingo Tauro' florin, candidate for IGP denomination, and above all it is the 'city of flowers', with the hundreds of companies operating in the area and in the district, all well established on national and foreign markets by virtue of their excellent and much sought-after products: a true treasure of biodiversity.   But Terlizzi has many 'flowers', and all to be discovered, in an emotional journey that smells of both the ancient and the modern, where modernity is under everyone's eyes and the ancient is well portrayed, up to the point of reliving, in the pages offered by passionate scholars such as Don Gaetano Valente and arch. Michele Gargano, accustomed to immersing themselves in the documentary papers as in the maze of narrow streets and paved widenings of the medieval village enclosed by the 'stradone', overlooked by the elegant residences of the families that have made history in the city. {IMAGE_4}{IMAGE_7} At the edge of the mediaeval town, one can admire the elegant bulk of the neoclassical Co-Cathedral dedicated to St Michael Archangel, built on the 13th-century Collegiate Church that bore the signature of Anseramo da Trani, whose refined portal set in the Church of the Rosary can still be admired. In continuity, as if guarded by the tall bell tower with its bulbous, oriental-style termination, is the Church of the Immaculate Conception. It houses, amidst stuccowork and ornate Baroque ornamentation, a sequence of canvases depicting stories from the Old Testament and the life of the Madonna painted by Domenico Antonio Carella.   But what literally takes your breath away is the celebrated Adoration of the Shepherds by Corrado Giaquinto around 1750. A stone's throw away is the Pinacoteca Civica, which houses the rich legacy of works (over a thousand) by Michele de Napoli (1808-1892) in the same rooms as the artist's residence. It leads to Terlizzi's main square, dominated by the austere bulk of the Norman Tower, a strategic defence work, today the Clock Tower, crowned by civil architecture, including the Palazzo del governo cittadino (town government building) in conjunction with the Millico Theatre, and religious architecture, the churches of San Gioacchino and Santa Lucia with the War Memorial by Giulio Cozzoli in the centre, without neglecting the memory of illustrious Terlizzi citizens who fought for freedom and were slaughtered at the Fosse Ardeatine: Don Pietro Pappagallo and Gioacchino Gesmundo, whose commemorative monument is in Largo La Ginestra.   Your gaze along the Corso lingers on the imposing façade of Palazzo de Gemmis, with Vanvitellian-style inventions, and on the nearby church of Santa Maria la Nova, which was the forge of culture and theological knowledge of the Friars Minor Observant. It houses first-class works of art, such as the Nativity (1540) by Giovan Girolamo Savoldo (1480c-1548) and the Madonna and Child with Saints John the Baptist and Francis of Assisi (1532-1533) by Giovanni Antonio de Sacchis, known as Pordenone (1483c-1539).   An authentic oasis of peace and spirituality, along the routes of the Francigena, the Borgo di Sovereto encloses and preserves, as a precious pearl, the sanctuary of the patron Virgin whose icon was found, according to ancient legends, by a shepherd in a cave. Ѐ the Marian effigy of the Theotòkos (Mother of God), which every year, in the ritual commemoration of the mythical discovery, crosses the main streets of the town hoisted on the mammoth 'triumphal chariot' for the 'major feast' on the first Sunday of August, sealing one of the most beautiful and exhilarating feasts to be witnessed in Apulia.   THE TRIUMPHAL FLOAT   Terlizzi's triumphal float represents the symbol in which the entire community recognises itself. It is a festive machine with a wooden supporting structure and a 22-metre-high canvas covering, which every year parades along the main city streets, pushed by more than fifty men and driven by four helmsmen in traditional dress, directed by a head helmsman who skilfully leads it through the traditional and spectacular curves of the city centre.   It carries in triumph the icon of Our Lady of Sovereto and the statue of Saint Michael, the city's main patron saints, as well as a large number of children, seated on the steps leading from the 'carretta' to the 'throne' on which the sacred image of the Virgin is placed.   In Terlizzi, the tradition of the triumphal cart, attested by some documents from the 16th century, is intimately linked to the birth of the cult in honour of Our Lady of Sovereto. Its symbolism is imbued with content that refers to the legend of its discovery: the image of the Virgin was found by a shepherd who, while trying to free a stranded sheep, noticed the icon in an underground cavity. The shepherd was from Bitonto, while the icon was found in the Terlizzese countryside. The problem immediately arose as to which of the two municipalities the icon should belong to. It was thus decided to entrust the fate to the 'judgement of God'.   The image was placed on a cart drawn by two oxen, one from Bitonto and one from Terlizzi. The latter prevailed, blinding the ox from Bitonto with a horn. The cart thus arrived in Terlizzi, constantly changing its appearance. In 1868 it took on its final shape, both in its supporting structure and in its architectural and decorative components, handed down to the present day, thanks to Michele De Napoli, a great neoclassical painter who had become mayor of the town, who designed a new festive machine.   The operational construction of the float was entrusted to set designer Raffaele Affaitati from Foggia. Since then, the float has remained virtually unchanged in its stylistic components and continues to deeply move people on the first Sunday of August each year.   Places to visit: Co-cathedral of San Michele Arcangelo, Church of Santa Maria la Nova, Church of the Immaculate Conception, Church of the Rosary and Portal of Anseramo da Trani, Medieval village, Norman Tower (or Clock Tower), Palazzo di Città and 'Millico' Theatre, 'Michele de Napoli' Art Gallery, Sanctuary and village of Sovereto, Sanctuary of Santa Maria di Cesano.   text by Franco di Palo / photos by Francesco De Chirico

cities

30 April 2021

CAPURSO

Caput Ursi, the medieval village

Caput Ursi, the Medieval Village   CAPURSO (ba), a few kilometres from Bari's capital city, is a medieval village of the cult of the Madonna del Pozzo.   Traces of the town's existence can already be found before the year 1000, as evidenced by the frescoes found in the Grotta di Santa Barbara in the district of the same name. On the origin of the place name Capurso there are various interpretations, some of them quite fanciful, such as the legend of the bear.   According to this legend, the name of the town would come from the head of a bear (caput ursi) killed by the first inhabitants of the place, then placed on a cart and pulled by oxen. The town is said to have sprung up on the spot where the cart stopped its journey.   Capurso has passed through various foreign dominations, often suffering devastation and ruin. Over the centuries, Norman, Swabian and Angevin dominations followed. It was only with the advent of the Aragonese and, above all, thanks to the enlightened policies of Queen Bona Sforza, that the town took on a civic dignity of its own.   The French Revolution also had its effects on Capurso, where liberal ferments developed in support of a Neapolitan Republic as opposed to Bourbon domination.   The patron saint of Capurso is Santa Maria del Pozzo, venerated following a miracle that occurred in 1705. In that year, in fact, a priest from Capurso, Don Domenico Tanzella, was in very poor health. The Patron Saint is celebrated from dawn on the last Sunday in August. {IMAGE_8}{IMAGE_1} There are two signs of entrustment to the Virgin: the handing over, by the Rector Friar of the Sanctuary, of the keys to the city and a golden rose donated by a Capurso family. Immediately afterwards, accompanied by evocative chants and supplications, there is the entrance of the company of pilgrims from Bisceglie.   It is one of the most beautiful moments of the feast and from here onwards tens of thousands of people visit the Virgin in fact Capurso is a destination for religious tourism, with many pilgrims visiting the Basilica and the Chapel from all over the world.   After the celebration, the solemn procession with coloured banners parades through the city streets and accompanies the Holy Image of Santa Maria del Pozzo with hundreds of candles. During the procession there are Marian songs and moments of prayer, and people pay homage to the Statue with fireworks, coloured rose petals and balloons let fly as she passes as a sign of joy and gratitude.   Sunday evening also sees the night procession dedicated to Our Lady of the Well, in which the majestic and glittering hand-drawn Triumphal Chariot, dedicated to her, parades, accompanied by almost two hundred figures in 18th-century dress.   The imposing procession is cadenced by the Marian melodies played by the band and the pressing rhythm of the musicians. Of great beauty are the architecture of the old town and the main churches, which fascinate the visitor between history and spirituality.   To visit: Basilica of Santa Maria del Pozzo, Cappella del Pozzo, Convent of San Francesco da Paola, Mother Church of the Santissimo Salvatore.   Photo by: Nicola Taranto.

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the Producers 

30 April 2021

Mastrototaro Food

"From field to table' for Mastrototaro Food is not an abstract concept but a real promise the company makes to the consumer.     We are in BISCEGLIE (Bat), a flourishing land lapped by the waters of the Adriatic Sea. It is precisely between the land and the sea that the preserves of Mastrototaro Food are born, products that symbolise the authenticity of Apulia and the genuine flavour of tradition.     The company has a long entrepreneurial history behind it, which began in 1956 and runs in the agricultural sector.     In 2008, Mastrototaro Food decided to further enhance the raw materials produced on the company's land by transforming them into excellent agro-food preserves. Three decades of expertise in the sector did the rest.     Today it is the three brothers, Mauro, Giulio and Roberto, who with skill and ingenuity run the company, which is certified organic and one of the few in Italy to organise production from scratch. The cicerone of our journey through the delicacies of the Mastrototaro brand is Mauro, who, amidst vast expanses of olive groves and vast fields of cultivated land, tells us about the great effort made to offer the consumer a product in which quality is the undisputed queen.     The cultivation of vegetables according to the ancestral customs of our ancestors and love for nature are the winning elements of the company, which harvests the raw materials by hand and transforms them into preserves in just a few hours.     This makes it possible to preserve the organoleptic qualities of the vegetables, which unleash their goodness and taste delicious just by looking at them. Aubergines, artichokes, mushrooms, peppers, tomatoes, olives and courgettes are the raw materials that go well with the extra virgin olive oil produced by the company.     Looking at the farm shop, we seem to be looking at a slightly larger version of grandma's classic larder. A triumph of colours is what presents itself to our eyes as visitors, where we gaze in amazement at the different nuances of the jarred vegetables.     With pride, Mauro explains the company's precise philosophy: to recover the ancient recipes for preserves in order to make them known beyond the borders of Apulia. And so we discover the 'Pric 'o prac', an ancient Molfettese sauce, now impossible to find, made from peppers and tomatoes, or the biscegliese antipasto with artichokes, champignon mushrooms, peppers and olives.     We cannot fail to mention the exquisite artichokes available in several versions. Grilled, stemmed, 'della mamma' or 'pugliese' style: all are exceptional with their tender heart dipped in the golden yellow of extra virgin olive oil. Tradition yes, but also innovation, like the refined lentil and sun-dried tomato mousse that combines the nutritional properties of the legume with the lively flavour of sun-dried tomatoes.      Mastrototaro Food's list of products is a long one. Mauro explains that a company like his, which puts the consumer before turnover, is the result of great teamwork. A team that wins because it plays well in the field. That field that Mastrototaro Food brings in jars directly to our.    

Farm

30 April 2021

Azienda Agricola Iannone

A typical mildly hilly Murgia landscape, made more barren by the paths of the karst blades that furrow its path. We are in ACQUAVIVA DELLE FONTI (ba), a small village in Puglia that, like a precious ancient mosaic, delights visitors with its beauty.     In this area that encloses ancient farms surrounded by the inimitable dry-stone walls, trulli and underground caves, the Iannone Farm was founded in 1996, producing the Red Onion and the Red Sponzale of Acquaviva delle Fonti flanked by the Black Chickpea of the Murgia Carsica, a triad of goodness that over the years has won the coveted Slow Food Presidium.     Leading us on this journey that speaks of traditional and incredibly territorial productions is Vito Abrusci, farm manager, whom we meet directly in the field in one of the districts that hosts the cultivation of onion, sponzale and black chickpea following the dictates of organic farming.     One can speak of a genuine advantage that such areas offer to this type of product due to the uniqueness of the organic richness that positively impacts the land. The excellent quality of the deep, potassium-rich, well-drained and aerated soils allow these crops to be born and grow abundantly, preserving all the incredible organoleptic and beneficial characteristics contained by nature.     The cultivation and harvesting of the Iannone company's red onion is manual, and the product is distinguished by its flattened shape and weight that are difficult to replicate. In this vegetable, the outer color is clearly distinguishable, evoking a palette of beautiful shades ranging from red to magenta almost purple and then showing the pale pink interior fading to white.     The sweet taste and intense aroma make the Red Onion perfect for fresh consumption or as a processed product. Speaking of red onion, we cannot fail to mention the sponzale, which is the bulb that is born by reproduction from the mature onion. The company cultivates it according to traditional methods, and the sponzale, also known as sponsale, keeps the delicate and light flavor of the onion intact.     An ancient vegetable whose name of Latin origin evokes the flatbread that was eaten during the sponsàlia, the ceremony that celebrated the future spouses. To think that the black chickpea of the Murgia Carsica has gone into space is something that leaves one astonished. The space chickpea, in every sense of the word, was chosen for its incredible properties for astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti's soup.     It is different from other legumes because of its dark color and hooked, wrinkled shape. Already known in the nineteenth century, Vito explains that Black Chickpea has always been the staple of the agricultural diet as a substitute for meat, at that time a food prerogative only of wealthy families.     The "poor man's meat," as the legume was once called, is palatable and very rich in fiber and iron. A peasant food that opens the door to a wonderful land.    

Tarallo factory

30 April 2021

Puglia Sapori

If we had to choose a shape for Puglia, it would be the classic and curvy roundness of the tarallo. Symbol of our oldest culinary traditions, with a history that spans centuries, the tarallo is the foundation of the Puglia Sapori company.     We are in CONVERSANO (BA), an architectural jewel with one of the most beautiful historic centres in the region. Founded in the nineties, the family-run company Puglia Sapori took its first steps in the local pastry sector, and then in 2000 began producing tasty savoury snacks.     Our guide is Roberto Renna, operations manager of the company, which stands alongside other companies halfway between the city and the open countryside, as if to convey a direct link with nature and its goodness. The skill with which Puglia Sapori combines the taste of its snacks with respect for tradition has become their trademark.     The ingredients to make tarallini are few, but of high quality, perfectly representing an entrepreneurial philosophy that has always wanted to keep the homemade version of baked goods alive. A company that has adapted its production to the original recipe and that, in addition to excellent raw materials, respects the preparation from start to finish.     It is no coincidence that Puglia Sapori is one of the few companies that still boils the tarallo, just as it was done in the homes and bakeries of yesteryear. As Roberto explains, this is a fundamental step that preserves the fragrance and consistency of the product, even though it makes the process take longer.   {IMAGE_0}{IMAGE_1}   The continuous search for the perfect sensory experience, combined with the typical crunchiness of the tarallo, has lead Puglia Sapori to produce a wide range of truly delicious specialities. The Classic Line offers, just to name a few, taralli with fennel seeds, simple with extra virgin olive oil, multigrain, with chilli pepper, pizza flavour, onion flavour, and a Multipack version, so you always have a fresh bag available.     One of the central themes of Puglia Sapori products is attention to health. This is why the brand has invested in continued research and development, and has accompanied the Classic line with Gluten free and Organic options as well. There is something for everyone in the Organic line. You can choose between multigrain tarallini (tasty but also light), spelt tarallini, and specialities with Senatore Cappelli durum wheat, all prepared with extra virgin olive oil and yeast-free.     “Just as good without” is the motto of the Gluten-free line, which has its own dedicated factory and a recipe developed in collaboration with the University of Bari. The goal was to find the right mix of gluten-free flours that would leave the taste of the classic tarallo unaltered.     We are pleased to say that Puglia Sapori has succeeded, offering their consumers options with buckwheat, quinoa flour, wholegrain, or legumes.     Tasty and enjoyable, for a delicious snack that tastes like Puglia from the very first bite.       

Tarallo factory

07 December 2022

Freehand

A story that has its roots far back in time, because far back Don Riccardo Agresti has always been able to look: all it takes is a farm and many hands just asking to be used for something good. This is how the taralli of 'a Mano Libera' were born, thanks to the Diocese of Andria's 'Senza Sbarre' project.     We are in the Andria countryside, enjoying a beautiful panorama, with Castel del Monte standing out in the background, symbol of an ancient and true Apulia. Here we find the fortified masseria San Vittore.     San Vittore has become a place of rehabilitation and reintegration for dozens of inmates and ex-convicts with its ten hectares of land. The bright colours of the fruit, the fragrances of the vegetable garden, the sound of the wind passing through the branches of the olive trees are accessories to the scent coming from the kitchens.     Don Riccardo tells us that the "Senza sbarre" project and the "a Mano Libera" cooperative produce handmade taralli with quality natural raw materials and km 0. They are truly handmade, because there are no industrial machines to shape the taralli to the grains being processed: the busy and skilful hands of the operators move with precision on the counters and arrange those rounded shapes of pure love on the baking trays.     In addition to the classic fennel seed taralli, tasty varieties have been added, such as the one already mentioned with cereals, then the one with sun-dried tomatoes, which combines one of the most identifying flavours of the Apulian territory with a typical product, and the taralli with Nero di Troia: usually taralli are kneaded with white wine, while here one of the most acclaimed local varieties is chosen.     The scent coming from the oven spreads throughout the premises dedicated to production, which starts with dough made from quality local flours. The dough is shaped strictly by hand and then boiled, after which the taralli end up in the oven, the author of those fragrances that can be savoured well before entering the premises.     "a Mano Libera" was born as an alternative measure to prison, giving hope and new perspectives to its operators, but also quality traditional products for all the world's gluttons.     The proceeds from the sale of the taralli go back into circulation, reinvested to give other people who have seen prison in their path a chance at redemption.

Winery

30 April 2021

“Cantine Barsento” factory

The journey to Noci (ba), a small town in the pleasant Murgia hills where Cantine Barsento is located, is studded with natural landscapes that stretch as far as the eye can see, breathtakingly beautiful. In this unspoilt territory, a winery was born more than fifty years ago that, as the current Sole Director Rocco Colucci tells us, 'translates the essence of Puglia into wine'.     Cantine Barsento is a lively winery founded in 1969 with a visionary mission for the time: to promote quality wines from the Nocese countryside alone. What makes this winery so special and unique is something that, once you cross the threshold of the establishment, you do not expect to find: about one thousand square metres of underground cellar dug into the limestone rock and 15 metres deep.     A true oenological jewel that amazes for its unexpected beauty, with its tunnels and perfectly organised cells that enclose true and precious treasures of our winemaking tradition. The function of the underground cellar is to obtain a wine aged in the rock cellar, ensuring that there is precise control of temperature and humidity.     The indigenous grape varieties are Primitivo, Malvasia and Negramaro: grapes chosen for their expression of territoriality, authenticity and specificity and whose quality is further sublimated through an exclusively manual harvesting process.   {IMAGE_0}{IMAGE_1}   Cantine Barsento's labels (they are divided between IGP and DOC) are not simply wine products, but are much more: they represent the passion for quality grapes and their bond with nature, the sole creator of the rare characteristics of each raw material.     Intense and generous is the Paturno, a ruby with a complex and at the same time sweetish bouquet typical of the Primitivo from which it comes, or the Ladislao, a pure Negramaro that is impenetrable, almost gloomy. It has mature, decidedly virile aromas, is aged in oak barrels and is a wine for those who love to surprise and be surprised.     If we wanted to give it a personification, Casaboli would certainly be a woman with an elegant appearance and refined intelligence. Made from Primitivo, this DOC is a wine of depth that blends its pleasantness with tannicity. Playful, fresh, sweet. This is Primitivo Malicchia Mapicchia, a meditation nectar of great vinosity on the palate, aged for a year and pleasant for any culinary combination.     Cantine Barsento's winemaking tradition also runs on the catering track through the Bamì restaurant. The mission? To fuse two incredible arts: the art of cooking and the art of winemaking and bring them together in one form, Bamì. The restaurant is located inside Cantine Barsento and espouses the concept of enhancing raw materials and dishes that respect the organoleptic properties of the ingredients. A concept that, if we dare say so, is clothed in sacredness.     The same that has always accompanied those who, in various forms, work the products of the earth with respect and devotion.    

Liquor factory

30 April 2021

Gargano Delizie

A wonderful village, known as the Pearl of Gargano, stands on a bluff overlooking the crystal clear sea, kissed by white sand and embraced by towering rocky cliffs.     We are in Peschici, and in this incredible landscape that smells of salt and Mediterranean vegetation, GARGANO DELIZIE® was born, an artisan distillery that shares the history of the territory through its products.      Started in 2002 by Michele and Patrizia Caputo, the couple immediately based their production on quality and craftsmanship, resulting in a series of unique creations. Crossing the threshold of the small laboratory, we are immediately attracted to the tanks containing delicious infusions and delighted by the contagious enthusiasm that Michele and Patrizia have for their work.     Production takes place in Ischitella (fg), a town a few kilometres from Peschici, but the salespoint is found in the historic city centre of Peschici (fg), in an area brimming with tasty shops full of local goodness. The Peschici shop also offers other local specialities and traditional gastronomy, such as jams, preserves, pâtés, and much more, offering a variety of products that fully reflects our culinary culture.   {IMAGE_0}{IMAGE_1}   Sharing all the unique characteristics of a territory, passing down its traditions and unearthing its cultural heritage, is a great undertaking. Each liqueur by Gargano Delizie (of which there are about forty) is born from a careful study of the local traditional recipes, but most importantly from the scrupulous search for raw materials that are processed according to the artisanal and homemade methods used by our ancestors. Michele and Patrizia tell us about their flagship product, the "Amaro della Suocera", a sweet elixir from 1900 also known as the “cherry of the grandmothers".     "Amaro della Suocera" is made with local Primitivo wine and black cherry juice, and it was their 90-year-old uncle who shared its ancient secrets with them. Patrizia also tells us about their "Amico", another greatly enjoyed liqueur dedicated to their customers to celebrate 18 years of production.     The idea came from a childhood memory of her grandfather dunking a slice of peach into his glass of wine. That's why "Amico" is made with Falanghina PGI wine and Gargano peaches, an elixir in which the goodness of the fruit is enhanced by the alcohol. In this family-run workshop, two other products must be mentioned: the "Lemolivo", a lemon liqueur made with local orange peels and olive leaves which infuse it with a green colour reminiscent olives, and the "Gargano's” artisan beer, developed from a recipe by Michele and Patrizia that includes, among other ingredients, peels from the Gargano bitter orange.     A product that symbolises the territory in its very label: a pearl resting in an oyster with a historical “trabucco” fishing machine, with citrus fruits crowning the beautiful Pearl of Gargano.  

Winery

30 April 2021

D'Arapri Cellars

Three friends with a passion for jazz music and for the indigenous grape varieties of the Tavoliere, an underground cellar with an irresistible charm and sparkling wines that gather admirers from all over the world. There is nothing lacking in the history of Cantine d'Araprì: friendship, love for their land, a far-sighted project and an uncommon entrepreneurial flair.     At the basis of the company was the conviction that it would be possible to produce fine sparkling wines in the south too, using the indigenous Capitanata grape variety: 'Bombino bianco'. This is how the three friends, Girolamo d'Amico, Louis Rapini and Ulrico Priore created their dream in 1979. Cantine d'Araprì is the first company in Apulia to produce sparkling wine using the classic method.     A courageous choice, which over time has proved successful and led to numerous awards. Entering their cellar, one cannot fail to notice the dozens of awards won over the years for the skill with which they enhance the territory. The building housing Cantina d'Araprì, dating back to the beginning of the 18th century and located in the historic centre of San Severo (fg), seems almost like a house that holds extraordinary treasures.     We discover to our amazement that beneath our feet are a thousand square metres of underground cellar accessed through a maze of tunnels and galleries. The space periodically hosts cultural events and exhibitions. The environment welcomes and guards the precious sparkling wine that rests placidly waiting to be ready to be uncorked.     We almost feel as if we are witnessing a ceremony, in the silence of the basement and surrounded by stacks of bottles whose contents follow precise artisanal protocols refined through experience. Among the sparkling wines we find the vintage rosé 'Sansevieria', obtained from the manual harvesting of Nero di Troia grapes with its gentle colour and sweet citrus scent.     For dry lovers, the 'Pas Dosè' made from Bombino Bianco and Pinot Nero is a sparkling wine with a convincing character softened by hints of pastry. Montepulciano and Pinot Noir are the precious ingredients of 'Brut Rosè', a sparkling wine with a fine, rounded flavour and aromas of bread and toasted fruit.     Ethereal and gentle is the bouquet of 'Brut', the first sparkling wine to be produced by the house, which envelops the consumer with fruity scents of apple, yellow peach and orange. Leading us on this sparkling wine journey are Anna d'Amico, daughter of Girolamo, and Daniele Rapini, son of Louis.     Because one of the characteristics of the winery is the interweaving of friendship and familiarity that binds the members of the company. The three founding partners were joined in 2019 by the so-called 'new generation' embodied by the three children: Anna d'Amico, Daniele Rapini and Antonio Priore, all three of whom are driven by the desire to carry on the tradition started by their fathers.     Each bottle of d'Araprì sparkling wine is like a perfect jazz melody: it slowly reveals its amazing notes, telling of a product that smells of Apulia and friendship.    

Winery

30 April 2021

Pandora Cellars

In the heart of Brindisi, a thriving land rich in millennia-old archaeological wonders, the Cantine Pandora winery was born.       Officially, the history of the business begins in 2017, but that of its founder has somewhat more remote origins. The owner, Francesco Fumarulo, owes his fortune to the land and his work as a farmer. With pride and transportation, Francesco explains that his passion for winemaking began as a child, and then over the years became a real profession culminating in the creation of Cantine Pandora.       The establishment stands in the midst of nature, among majestic olive trees, grazing animals, long rows of grapes and vast expanses of fields. Cradled by the healthy, placid air of Brindisi, Cantine Pandora's grapes turned into excellent red, white and rosé wine are almost all from Salento.       Francesco's willingness to contribute to the growth of his area is attested to by a very specific choice: to use largely native vines of Primitivo, Negramaro, Malvasia Nera and Malvasia Bianca grown according to organic standards.       With incredible respect for tradition and the aid of modern winemaking technology, Cantine Pandora is now a successful winery. The bottles are a small masterpiece that encapsulate the hard work, the love of the land, the work in the vineyard and in the cellar and, not surprisingly, they can all bear the IGP label.   {IMAGE_0}{IMAGE_1}   As the legend about the ancient Pandora's Box tells us, uncorking a bottle from this winery is tantamount to discovering all the good and beautiful of the land of origin.  Wine, otherwise also known as "nectar of the gods," for Cantine Pandora has an actual connection with divinity, to the point of deserving names that recall mythology.       To one of the "kings" of Salento, Primitivo, is dedicated Zeus, appellation of the highest Olympian deity. Zeus is a purplish-colored red produced from hand-picked grapes in the area's ancient vines, soft and enveloping with hints of red fruit.       Negramaro and Malvasia are the vines from which the grapes of Prometeo come, another red wine made from historic vines bred to trees that give the wine a delicate, broad, intense and pleasantly dry and full-bodied flavor. Then we find Ermes, Negramaro del Salento vinified in purity with the traditional method, tannic and structured to the right point. To Athena and Aphrodite are dedicated two of the rosés, both obtained from Negroamaro grapes and with intense fruity and very balanced scents. Among the whites we find Gea, a Malvasia Bianca del Salento wine with a refined, structured and persistent character or the charming Era, created from Chardonnay grapes that stands out for its golden hues and fine, dry but harmonious flavor.       Cantine Pandora's flagship product is the red '71 IGT, aged 6 months in French oak barrels. Strong, generous and intense are its aromas, so reminiscent of dried figs, which in this wine produced from Primitivo vines give it an original and strong-willed character.       Wines that fascinate the consumer for their overpowering and vigorous content, just like the territory from which they come.    

Oil mill

30 April 2021

“Cima di Bitonto” factory

The destination of our journey is the OLEIFICIO COOPERATIVO CIMA DI BITONTO, a proud bastion of a thousand-year-old tradition in our Apulia region. We are in Bitonto (ba), a few kilometres from the Apulian capital, in the heart of Puglia's extra virgin olive oil production.     An expanse of olive trees as far as the eye can see appears before the eyes of those travelling through the Bari hinterland. Once there, we cannot help but breathe in the intense scent of vegetation, as if we were immersed in an expanse of centuries-old olive trees. After all, nature is not so far away from us here, with the lush greenery of the adjacent Lama Balice, a treasure trove of wild flora and fauna biodiversity.     Waiting for us is Pasquale Mastandrea, President of the Oleificio Cooperativo. From his very first words we sense his boundless love for this generous land and its fruits. The Cima di Bitonto Cooperative has a history of more than sixty years and with its 350 members manages to pursue the incredible commitment of obtaining the best 'olive juice' made in Puglia.     A commitment clearly manifested in the Oleificio's logo, in which the word 'Puro', referring to oil, stands out against the elements of nature. Sun, rain, earth and the fruit that is born: all very important aspects to give the consumer an oil that tastes of tradition. In its years of activity, the Cooperative has managed to safeguard the land and the farmers thanks to a synergic work established with its numerous members.   {IMAGE_0}{IMAGE_1} From them comes the promise to preserve the olive cultivars and to make the area in which they grow known. It is no coincidence that the cultivated varieties are 70% Ogliarola and 30% Coratina: both originate from the growing area and are processed within a few hours of their harvest.     The agronomic methods used by the Cooperative's members are inspired by ancient local traditions and those notions handed down over the centuries that allow the plant to grow healthy and robust. The pruning system adopted allows the best nourishment to the shoots and young branches, so as to obtain a truly exceptional juice.     Cima di Bitonto brand oils are all extra virgin. The decisive character of the Coratina is mitigated by the sweetness of the Cima di Bitonto and the result is an extra virgin oil that combines the peculiarities of both cultivars, resulting in an intense yellow oil with a balanced presence of fruit and herbaceous hints. In addition to the classic extra virgin olive oil, much appreciated for its medium fruitiness, in the Oleificio's product basket we discover the D.O.P Terra di Bari, a harmonious, slightly spicy extra virgin with herbaceous fragrances.     From organic farming comes the 'Biologico' extra virgin olive oil. In this oil, the olive, with its strong flavour, and the almond, which is more delicate, stand out very well and do not alter the taste of a dish but, on the contrary, enhance it as it deserves.